Our Wildlife

HideAway Haven is also a haven for our local wildlife.  We have seen possums, bandicoots, skinks, many varieties of frogs.  While you enjoy your breakfast look out the window and see what else is having breakfast too.

Wildlife at HideAway Haven

HideAway Haven is also a haven for our local wildlife.  We have seen possums, bandicoots, skinks, many varieties of frogs.  While you enjoy your breakfast look out the window and see what else is having breakfast too.

Our Western Ringtail Possum (Polly) lives in the tree above the stairs.  She welcomes our guests when they arrive home after a night out.  She can often be heard scurrying across our deck looking for cat food.  We have a lot of peppermint trees in our garden and this is their main source of food.  We also leave fruit for Polly to eat at night.  Their conservation status is vulnerable. Births occur mainly in winter, usually of only one young. The young emerge from the pouch at about three months of age, when they weigh about 125 g, and suckle until they are 6–7 months old, weighing about 550 g 

 Bandicoot  (also known as Quella in the aboriginal language)  breed several times during the year. Females can give birth to as many as five babies, but usually only one or two survive.

They have a very short gestation period of only 12 1/2 days, the shortest of any marsupial. The young are born very tiny and under-developed. They travel through a cord attached to their mother's womb to reach the pouch, where they are able to drink milk from their mother's teats, and grow until they are large enough to leave of the pouch. When they are about three months old, they can begin to live independently. Bandicoot pouches are open at the back, to stop dirt entering the pouch when the mother digs.  We have seen 3 recently, we suspect it may be Mum and her 2 babies.

The motorbike frogLitoria moorei, is a frog well known in. Its common name comes from the male frog's mating call, which sounds similar to a motorbike changing up through gears; we have had guests ask if there is a speedway close by that operates all night.

Skinks are part of the lizard family.  The King Skink is a large, heavy-bodied black skink that can reach a length of 55 centimetres.  You can often see the skinks sunning themselves on the rocks below the deck.

The Bobtail is short-tailed, slow moving species of blue-tongued skink found in Australia. Three of the four recognised subspecies are found only in Western Australia, where they are known collectively by the common name bobtail

Kangaroos - we may not have any kangaroos on the property but there are a lot of them in the area surrounding us.  You can see them from the common room and the decks on Room 1 and 2.  Kangaroos have large, powerful hind legs, large feet adapted for leaping, a long muscular tail for balance, and a small head. Like most marsupials, female kangaroos have a pouch called a marsupium in which joeys complete  development.  

The kangaroo is an unofficial symbol of Australia and appears as an emblem on the Australian coat of arms and on some of its currency and is used by some of Australia's well known organisations, including Qantas and the Royal Australian Air Force. The kangaroo is important to both Australian culture and the national image, and consequently there are numerous popular culture references.

Rabbits  We have a couple of bunny's that visit us from time to time.  Although considered a pest we enjoy watching them play on our property.